Frans Snyders ‘ painting depicts a lord butcher over a carnivore carnage scene.
Upset students at Cambridge University successfully petitioned for the removal from their dining hall of a painting portraying a butcher.
The painting, The Fowl Market by the Dutch artist Frans Snyders ‘ workshop in the early 17th century, stood large above those in Hughes Hall’s dining room, a postgraduate school in Cambridge.
In his labors, the drawing portrays the butcher, surrounded by a true mountain of dead animals. A living dog seems to be barking nearby.
Cambridge’s spokeswoman told The Telegraph in November. “Some diners felt unable to eat because it was on the wall,”. “People who don’t eat meat found it slightly repulsive. They asked for it to come down.”
And maybe even carnivores aren’t exactly what to face with an artistic depiction of where their food comes from.
In his time, Snyders was an important Dutch painter, and one of the earliest animaliers, painters specialized in painting mainly animal subjects. This led him to collaborate on several occasions with Peter Paul Reubens.
In Reubens ‘ Prometheus Bound (c. 1611–1612, completed by 1618), Snyders painted the eagle stealing Prometheus ‘ perpetually regenerating liver, punishment for Prometheus stealing Zeus ‘ fire. Snyders also painted the hair of the snake on Medusa painting by Reubens c.1618.
The Fowl Market had been on a long-term loan from the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge to Hughes Hall.
It was restored and placed in “Feast & Fast after the artwork was removed in November.
The Art of Food in Europe 1500–1800, a show that “will shed light on many contemporary and controversial issues such as the origins of food and food security, over-consumption in austerity times.
And our relationship with animals and nature, connecting the past with our present and encouraging visitors to question and rethink our relationship with food, “according to the museum’s press materials.
For the duration of the exhibition, created by the British “food artist” duo Bompas & Parr, who became renowned for their gelatin-building creations, the museum will have a 12-foot-tall pineapple installed outside on its front lawn.
What, if any, Hughes Hall’s artwork would hang in place of its banished butcher is unknown.


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